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The Top 10 Sexiest Cars Of All Time

Picking these cars was exciting... not so much as judging a swimsuit contest, but not far from that either. Yet still definitely fun.

What is car sexiness? That's hard to define... I guess you know it when you see it. But there's a seductiveness about any sexy car, a lust if you will... Maybe it's the "I gotta have it" feeling. Even if it's only 1:24 scale.

So here they are, and in no real particular order:

  Countach

Lamborghini Countach In the late 1970s and early 80s, what teenage did not have a poster of this car on their wall... unless Farrah took up too much room. The low height and exaggerated length provided proportions never seen before or since. And its name translates (roughly) into "Oh my gosh!," and rightfully so.

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Car Lusts of the '00s: The List

  CXT vs GTI R32With the introduction outta the way, let’s begin listing the (probably) lust-worthy vehicles of the 00’s. A quick reminder: This list doesn’t list said vehicles from model year 2000 to 2010 one by one but categorizes vehicles that fit into the Car Lust way of thinking, so that means that obvious choices aren’t included unless given an explanation. Yes, there’s gonna be exceptions. Yes, there will be disagreements, but just give ‘em time to grow on you, like a decade. Or three. Now, onto the wall of text list.

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Great Commercials - Summer of Style

If you’re convinced that after watching the 2015 Cadillac Escalade commercial that all of their commercials in recent memory are underwhelming, or that they’re not as fun as they used to be, this one might prove that it’s not entirely so.

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Great Commercials - Let’s Dance

There’s a reason why I was hard on the 2015 Cadillac Escalade commercial: I like Cadillacs. And I like some of their commercials. To see the brand sell its products, in this case one of its most recognizable and best-selling, in such a fashion prompted me to fire up the keyboard then. Thankfully, unlike Honda/Acura, Cadillac has yet to leave me head-scratching or downright displeased through their advertisement on multiple occasions. The following video, while about a decade old, shows one of my favorites from the brand:

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Great Commercials - Vauxhall: 50 Years (and 5 million cars) After

What do we know about Vauxhall? We know they’re part of GM and that they sell rebadged Opels as well as Holdens/Isuzus/Suzukis, etc., depending on which model we’re talking. I’ve gotten the impression that they were able to build some of the most boring cars of the UK and at the same time some of the most bonkers. But did you know that the plant producing Vauxhalls as we know it turned 50 years old? How about that it produced 5 million cars during that time frame? Just one of those two milestones is more than enough reason to produce one of the most entertaining commercials that one can’t find on Western television programming:

 

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Carspotters' Challenge #134: The Drive-In Theater

Most are gone now, but a tradition in the 1950s, '60s, and '70s was the drive-in theater. Usually on warm summer weekend nights, these places were full of cars, people, and delicious food served right there on the premises.

Some Drive-Ins charged by the car load, others by the individuals per car. So a trunk packed with 4-5 people sneaking into one was not uncommon. (Been there, bought the T-shirt, as they say ;) .)

And as the joke goes, they had very low prices for the afternoon matinee.

Drive-In Theatre CSC 1

They were also a place where both hanky and panky occurred... just don't get caught!

See anything you'd like to drive home? (Extra points if you can identify the movie that's playing. Extra EXTRA points if you can identify the cars in the movie that's playing!))

--That Car Guy (Chuck)

Image Credit: Our warm Summer evening at the drive-in image was found at DriveTheNation.com.

April 20 Weekly Open Thread: "What Is A Blueprinted Engine?"

"Hey, I have a hot rod with a blueprinted engine!"

Engine-blueprintMany of us have heard somebody say that, then we nod our heads in agreement. And some of even have a slight idea of what that means. So to help explain this, we turn to EngineBasics.com, who at least partially define Engine Blueprinting as:

"A true blueprinted motor though, is one were every single part has been measured and matched exactly to a tolerance that FAR EXCEDES the manufacturers original tolerances. On a blueprinted motor one could say there “are no tolerances”, since everything is matched at times to a hundred thousands of an inch. The amount of balancing a blueprinted motor needs is so low its off the scale. All bearing and races are measured to be with-in thousands of each-other."

They can say that a lot better than I can.

Therefore, basically, a blueprinted engine is one built to incredibly tight tolerances, mainly to avoid power-robbing vibration issues.

So there. And of course, this is also the place to discuss anything else even ever so slightly automotive related. With or without blueprints.

--That Car Guy (Chuck)

Image Credit: Our blueprinted engine example came from EddiesPerformance.com.

Car Lust Quantum Leap: The Chevette

I guess it should not be a surprise that I picked this microbial minicar, since about anything you do to a GM T-Body will improve it anyway. But I have always defended this car, which was the best-selling American small car of 1979 and 1980. After all, I did own two of these beauties.

Chevette 2 door

First off, I'd keep virtually all of the external sheet metal, but build an up-to-date, high-tensile steel space frame under there that meets today's crash standards. After all, is the Chevette really such a bad looking car?

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Car Lust in the early 1950s: A Boy And His '39 Plymouth

A bit of a digression from our usual fare for this post. Over the last couple of years I've developed a bit of a hobby with old diaries. I'd always wanted to maintain a diary/journal, though not so much because I think I have so much of importance to say for posterity. After my dad died several years ago, I realized that all of the stories he'd told us over the years now only existed in our memories; we couldn't go check them with him or hear them again, they were all lodged only in our imperfect memories as something of an oral history. I made a few attempts over the years to keep a diary (even when I was a kid) but they never lasted, I 1939 Plymouth Ad-07think because I never thought I had anything of profound interest to write. 

Then one day on a lark I bought a diary at an estate sale and started reading it through. That one was from 1948 written by a 60-something-year old Seattle housewife by the name of Lillie May (Reasoner) Smith. She wasn't anything particularly special and mostly she just recorded her daily doings. . . .which I found utterly fascinating. Instead of profound thoughts on Life and the Big Events of the day, she recorded her shopping trips, her husband's work as a longshoreman, picking berries on Orcas Island, dinner parties they attended, etc. Such a different world from the one I inhabit here in the later 20th and early 21st century with our computers and Internets and cable television and cell phones and such. So, I started my own diary, online this time, and went through and transcribed Lillie's  entry for the same day ("On this day in 1948. . .") and then entered my own doings. And I kept at it, I guess, partly out of a feeling of obligation to give the world her story as well as my own. When the year was up (her diary only was for a single year), I found another and started in on it. The second one was for 1967, a man this time, and he was kind of dull. 

But I found another one that was fairly complete for almost three years from 1952 to 1954 and started in on that. To be honest, for the first month or so I thought it was a teenage girl -- there was no identifying information in it -- but turned out it was written by a teenaged boy from Yakima, Washington. And he had a 1939 Plymouth coupe, much like the one pictured here. He was 16 at the time and the Plymouth kept popping up as he went through his daily teenaged high school boy life.

While we were both teenaged boys at one point, like Lillie May, it was a different world from the one I grew up in. He's had a few adventures in his Plymouth and many, many problems with it, some of which were his own fault. But the way he related to his car and the things he did with it are far different from what I experienced, and I thought I'd share some of his entries with Car Lust readers. No doubt some older readers will relate to what he went through, and younger ones may find the actual writings of a car-loving guy from the early 1950s enlightening. 

A couple of notes: He had very small, cramped writing and it was often difficult to make out words. Those I've put in [brackets] with the the word I think it is or in some cases just the letters it looks like in hopes context can render it intelligible to someone. More on the diarist below the fold. 

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Birth Year Fantasy Garage Challenge: Big Chris (1974)

Birth Year Fantasy Garage--Introduction 
Birth Year Fantasy Garage--Cookie the Dog's Owner (1961) 
Birth Year Fantasy Garage--Tigerstrypes (1989) 
Birth Year Fantasy Garage--Anthony Cagle (1962) 
Birth Year Fantasy Garage--Chris Hafner (1976)

1974 was a great year.  The world population reached 4 billion people.  Elvis was still alive.  Hank Aaron became the home run king passing Babe Ruth with #715 April 8th.  Nixon resigned, and I was born.

1974 wasn't what I'd consider a great year for cars, though there were some great car still being made.  It comes just after all the fun of the muscle car era.  Styling began to change, and the OPEC oil embargo plus smog restrictions had an impact on horsepower and performance.  Despite that, I was still able to find some cars I'd love to own today.

I live in the rust belt (Minnesota).  There's not much from 1974 left for picking through here.  So for my birth year challenge, I'm looking to Dallas. And when I run out of options there, I'm going to Phoenix.  I'm going to limit my search to just these two markets. I'm not going to just pick my favorite cars from 1974, but am choosing to pick from what is available on the market today.

Orange Corvette

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Pictured above: This is a forlorn Chevy Vega photographed by reader Gary Sinar. (Share yours)

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