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About Anthony Cagle

Anthony Cagle came of age in an era when women were women, men were kinda like women, too, and cars developed a reputation for being overdesigned and underpowered--the '70s. His Car Lust bonafides include owning only one car not made during that ersatz decade of automobile history and then for only a month and a half. He currently pursues archaeology and keeping his 1978 Mustang II as clean and wickedly fast as possible, all the while defending its honor among the hordes of non-Car Lust afficionados.

Posts by Anthony Cagle

Birth Year Fantasy Garage Challenge: Anthony Cagle (1962)

Birth Year Fantasy Garage--Introduction
Birth Year Fantasy Garage--Cookie the Dog's Owner (1961)
Birth Year Fantasy Garage--Tigerstrypes (1989)

Heck, for me this post almost wrote itself. In addition to the Cagle Mark III model, this annus incredibilis also saw a slough of really great cars that defined the post-1950s pre-muscle car era as one of ultimate cool. I had to do a little fiddling, but only with the middle-range car. I was really interested in a Buick Riviera but, while many were probably produced in 1962, it only started as a '63. I also wanted to Images62buickspecialconvinclude a Pontiac Star Chief but was unable to find one of that year for sale that wasn't a wreck, and I was a bit uneasy using published prices on these. But I also adore the Catalina/Bonneville so I went with those in my final search as well, along with a few others that have struck my fancy over the years. 

I took this challenge as a true "What if. . . ." with something of an added stipulation of my own devising that I would ditch whatever other vehicles I have and truly use these on a daily basis. What if I had $100k to spend on vehicles that would get me through pretty much the rest of my earthly existence? Admittedly, the long term costs of these could be substantial, although it is my belief that cars from this era are simple enough mechanically that you could keep them going for a long, long time if properly maintained and repaired when the inevitable happens. I don't live in a big rust state so I could reasonably expect the body and chassis to maintain integrity for the next 20-30 (hopefully!) years or so and I'm used to the other (often rather significant) odds and ends with my '78 that crop up; heck, I've driven that since 1990 on a regular basis as my only vehicle so it can be done (albeit somewhat expensively). 

Consequently, I chose a set of vehicles that would cover all the bases for me. . . .mostly. I wanted something really special for cruising around on those long summer days and nights, something to use more as a "daily driver", and another for a work vehicle. At the moment I'm doing a lot of fieldwork, so some form of truck was a necessity, although to be honest a 50+ year old truck won't be the most comfortable or economic means of transporting me and equipment around the state. 

On we go. . .to 1962!

Continue reading "Birth Year Fantasy Garage Challenge: Anthony Cagle (1962)" »

Leonard Nimoy, RIP.

A bit late on the uptake here, but we here at Car Lust are all saddened by the news of Leonard Nimoy's passing last week. We've had our fair share of fun with Star Trek around these parts, nerds that we are, so we were all a bit taken aback at the news and we would like to take this opportunity to salute Mr. Nimoy for a life well lived.

And I for one would like to retract everything I said a few weeks ago about a certain commercial possibly being the best car advertisement ever made. 

It wasn't. 

This is:

The only thing possibly holding it back is the amount of nerd backstory one must have to fully appreciate its astounding glory. But then, "Mr. Spock" is one of those extra-nerdal cultural icons so I think it's fair to say even without the more opaque bits (e.g., the Bilbo song), it still holds up.

We are also very fond of this photo of Nimoy with his 1963 Buick Riviera, perhaps one of the coolest car photos ever made:

SpockCar

More photos, backstory, and more fun at Jalopnik.

Requiescat In Pace, Spock. We here at Car Lust are eternally grateful that you did, in fact, word, and deed, live long and prosper. 

The Sneaky Hot 1974-1983 Volkswagen Rabbit (aka VW Golf Mk1)

"Sneaky Hot".

For the uninitiated, the term is somewhat au courant these days and refers to people (okay, almost always female) who are "not usually in the conversation of being among the hottest of their group, but when mentioned or seen you remember that they are rather attractive." 

It could, in my view, have a temporal component as well, describing someone you've seen or perhaps known for a while, who didn't initially strike you as being all that, but one day you look at them and see a certain attractiveness that you didn't notice before. Not really the "homely librarian" type of thing where a new outfit, hair style, Volkswagen_Rabbit_5-Door_(Hudson)and ditching the thick glasses transforms the ugly duckling into a graceful swan; we've all seen that schtick before, it's been the plot line of hundreds, probably thousands, of movies, TV episodes, and romance novels.

Not like the cinematic  treatments are all that believeable, of course; you can't just slap a pair of thick glasses on a smokin' hot actress and make her appear plain to anyone blessed with the gift of sight. No, this is more a function of a different, shall we say, perspective of the viewer rather than a different look for the viewee; and it can often take a long time for that perspective to change.

In the case of me and the VW Rabbit, it has taken most of my adult life. But I finally got there.

I honestly never gave the Rabbit/Golf a second look, except perhaps as this odd-looking "hatchback" thingie that I would never, ever Lust over, let alone want to drive and/or own. Even the famed GTI didn't blow my youthful skirt up, weaned as I was on ground-pounding American muscle cars as my performance icons. Nah, that goofy little square-looking front-drive Beetle-wanna-be wasn't my cup of tea and never, I assumed, would be. Oddly enough, however, it wasn't even a Mk1 that first piqued my interest: it was a plain, white four-door late model Golf that used to drive by every morning while I was waiting for the bus. For whatever reason, it began to strike me as a subtly sexy little thing; not supermodel hot, but more, well, sneaky hot. And I began to think "Hey, maybe those old Rabbits weren't too shabby after all. . . ."

Continue reading "The Sneaky Hot 1974-1983 Volkswagen Rabbit (aka VW Golf Mk1)" »

The Best Car Commercial Ever Made(?)

We've examined a few commercials before, some in detail worthy of OCD status. We've marvelled at the kitchiness of the slogans, the blending of retro and modern, celebrity endorsements, and the apparent disconnect between the commercial and the reality. We've even examined the social and political ramifications of certain commercials. We love them. We hate them. But which is the best of them?

I submit the following: the first (North American) commercial for the Fiat 500 Abarth, "Seduction" or “You'll Never Forget The First Time You See One”. Not only is it, in this correspondent's humble opinion, one heck of a commercial, but it also nicely embodies the essence of this humble motoring blog: 

Continue reading "The Best Car Commercial Ever Made(?)" »

January 26 Weekly Open Thread: No. Just. . . . . .No.

America's Best-Selling Cars and Truck are Built on Lies: The rise of fake engine noise

Fake engine noise has become one of the auto industry’s dirty little secrets, with automakers from BMW to Volkswagen turning to a sound-boosting bag of tricks. Without FartCanthem, today’s more fuel-efficient engines would sound far quieter and, automakers worry, seemingly less powerful, potentially pushing buyers away.

Softer-sounding engines are actually a positive symbol of just how far engines and gas economy have progressed. But automakers say they resort to artifice because they understand a key car-buyer paradox: Drivers want all the force and fuel savings of a newer, better engine — but the classic sound of an old gas-guzzler.

Read, as they say, the whole thing. 

In your humble correspondent's opinion, when Ford decided to tune the exhaust and pipe in some of the noise to the cabin to give more of that muscle car feel, I was a bit wary, but eventually (mostly) okay with it. It was the actual noise, just redirected a bit. Meh. Whatever.

And putting some sort of noisemaker on super-quiet electrics and hybrids just makes sense; it really is a safety issue. 

But a completely digital noise solely for the purpose of driver enhancement? No. Stop it. Stop. It. That's even worse than a fart can on an untuned Honda Civic. 

Feel free to vent and agree with me on this one. And anything else. 

Photo here.

January 19 Weekly Open Thread: The Return of the Ranger?

We'll start this week on another pickup-themed note: the potential return of a smaller pickup in Ford's arsenal. Since the Ranger ceased production (at least in North America) the only non-full-sized pickups have been from GM and brethren, Toyota's Tacoma, and Nissan's Frontier. And even these aren't what anyone would consider "compact" or even in the range of "small" except by comparison. In my Truck Lust post I lamented the increasing size of pickups in general and the extinction of true compact pickups like Ranger the Ford Courier. Without looking up the numbers, I'd wager a Tacoma is probably about the same size as a full-size F-150/Silverado/etc. from the 1980s and earlier. 

Last fall a number of news outlets ran stories about the potential return of Ford's Ranger to their North American lineup, such as this one from USAToday:

[Ford 's truck marketing manager, Dave] Scott says Ford is aiming for a true small pickup, not a midsize such as General Motors' 2015 Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon, which just went on sale, or Toyota Tacoma.

"We're looking at it. We think we could sell a compact truck that's more like the size of the old Ranger, that gets six or eight more miles per gallon (than a full-size truck), is $5,000 or $6,000 less, and that we could build in the U.S. to avoid the tariff on imported trucks," he says.

That tariff is something we here at Car Lust are familiar with. I haven't seen much since then to indicate Ford's plans. As they say, the Ranger now being sold is still in the range of the other mid-size units, and I suspect they may be correct that such a truck would probably steal sales from the F-150 rather than adding to them. Since they went all-aluminum with the F-150 (a pricey change) they can't really afford any diminution in sales. 

So what do you think? Is there still a market for a true, small pickup truck? One that would actually make money? What could they use for a base (e.g., a Focus-based unibody platform) or a rebadged import? 

As always, feel free to discuss anything else automotive-related. (Ranger photo is from our old post).

Pontiac Star Chief

This will be kind of a drive-by (pun intended) post; even I will admit that the Star Chief has little to recommend it, barely making it over the rather low bar we here at Car Lust set for automobiles to be "interesting". In fact, the only generation of this car that I really find "interesting" in a Lust-worthy sense is the fifth generation (1961-1964). As regular readers may know, I have some affection for that whole early '60s field of cars and the Star Chief fits the stylistic bill from that period to a T. Even so, it wasn't a spectacular 1962-pontiac-star-chief-sedan-photo-274720-s-1280x782performer or a great looker or a sales superstar or anything like that. 

So, um, why write about it then?

I honestly don't know; I just adore it for some reason. I think maybe it's the name: Star Chief. A Star Chief? A Space Indian? That's what I'd always thought it referred to, but looking back it probably had more to do with a Chief of police or something like that. At any rate, it has that sort of Buck Rogers 1950s vibe to the name, as if you were more likely to hop in and take it on a cruise to Mars than to your local drive-in. A car that a 12-year old boy might climb into and pretend he's on a mission from Star Command, where the cigarette lighter fires the photon torpedoes and the turn signals are laser cannons.

Yeah, that's the ticket. . . .

Continue reading "Pontiac Star Chief" »

Truck Lust: 1929-1932 Dodge Merchant's Express

I'm going to say it right up front: This may be, in my opinion, the most handsome pickup truck ever:

DodgeSideview

When I began my foray into the world of pickups, this Dodge was one of the first ones to grab my attention. Not because of its performance or place in history or any of that intellectual stuff. It just looks hot. There's just something so utterly perfect about its design, especially in this sideview, that strikes the right chord of utility, sportiness, proportion and captures the pure essence of its time; so much so that it justifiably ranks up there with a Monet landscape or a Bach contata; it's just that. . .right.

Well, perhaps I exaggerate. But only slightly. In truth, I really do believe that they got the design of this sucker just about perfect. And on their first (more or less) try!

Continue reading "Truck Lust: 1929-1932 Dodge Merchant's Express" »

Truck Lust: An Introduction

Interesting cars meet irrational emotion. 

That's our mission statement, of a sort, and we've hewn fairly close to it. Perhaps a bit too close. We have, I'm afraid, somewhat neglected one of the most popular personal vehicles on the road: the truck. More specifically, the pickup truck. Perhaps no vehicle is more distinctively American than the pickup OldPickup
truck. Oh sure, they're very popular in other countries as well (some more than others), but there seems to be something in our collective DNA that is attracted to this in some ways simplest of vehicles. As of this writing at the end of 2014 three of the top five best selling vehicles in the U.S. are pickups; the Ford F-150 has been the top selling vehicle in the U.S. for over the last 3+ decades. We love our pickups. We even love our sorta-pickups. What the Jaguar E-Type is, arguably, to Great Britain, the pickup truck is to the United States. 

And yet, we here at Car Lust have been somewhat remiss in highlighting these most pedestrian -- and I mean that in a good way -- of vehicles. Out of over a thousand posts we've covered a few true pickups -- some vintage Studes, Ford Ranger, the Subaru BRAT, and the VW Caddy -- and we've also delved into the realm of commercial trucks -- the Divco "Shark Noses" and REO Speedwagons (the trucks, not the band) -- but we've oddly avoided much discussion of perhaps the most common American vehicle on the roads. Obviously there are far more different kinds of cars out there than there are pickup trucks, and one might reasonably argue that a pickup is a pickup is a pickup (except to the enthusiast -- or partisan -- of course) in contrast to the various hatchbacks, coupes, sedans, muscle cars, etc. on the car side of things. We're also not generally a bunch of "pickup guys", in the same way we aren't generally "motorcycle guys" even though we've probably covered those more than trucks. 

Well, we aim to remedy that. Over the next few weeks and months we'll be devoting more space to these vehicles. I for one have developed something of a crush on pickups over the last couple of years for reasons that remain largely unknown (really; I don't know why), so much of this will be part of my personal Car Lust evolution and indulgence. Still, we've all got some experience with the humble pickup truck and we hope to bring a bit of fresh material for your Car Lusting pleasure. 

Continue reading "Truck Lust: An Introduction" »

A Very Car Lust Christmas!

I've decided to take the reins (pun intended) this year for our annual Christmas With the Car Luststribute to Santa's wheels skids. In past years we've examined the history and various incarnations of Santa's sleigh(s) and other Christmas-related automobiles, but this year I'm just going to toss out a few of my favorite Christmas and/or Santa-themed vehicles. No rhyme or reason involved, just bits and pieces from the Interwebs that may amuse you in between the egg nogs and holidays parties. Enjoy!

CarLustXmas

Continue reading "A Very Car Lust Christmas!" »

December 15 Weekly Open Thread: This Is The Time Of Year When Dreams Come True

It may not be on the scale (pun intended) of "Peace on Earth, Good Will Towards Men" but for we here at Car Lust, the following development is truly, awesomely, magnificently welcome. Gone are the days (hopefully) when all you could decorate your mantle with were Lambos, Ferarris, and other assorted supercars. Or even just the souped-up (sorta) versions of some regular cars. Now, we might just have the opportunity to display. . . .our own cars. This story from Autoweek:

If you had given up all hope of finding a scale model of your family truckster from back in the day, NEO Scale Models may be able to help. Models of domestic cars in 1:43 scale had basically been written off by model manufacturers because the U.S. market was never really deemed big enough to support them. Those that were offered tended to be purchased exclusively for decorating model train diaramas (O Gauge is 1:48 scale, by the way), and thus had to meet a very low price point. Thus diecast manufacturers like Minichamps, Norev, Herpa, and others focused their attention on churning out models of European cars, producing twenty different versions of a Porsche 911 race Dodge-aries car for every one car that someone might have actually had in their driveway, like a Volkswagen Golf.

Or a Mustang II! VW Caddy! Ford LTD! I've been looking for a Mustang II model kit for a while, but with no success (though never mind eBay). Even if I did find one in the box it would ruin its collectibility (I think) to put it together. So I'm hopeful these things will take off and become viable enough to expand. The design is virtual and, as the article notes, with 3D printing perhaps in the not-too-distant future we'll be able to specify year, color schemes, and options. Even so, once they make a fastback Mustang II, I'll be tempted to just buy whatever they have and paint the mother pink brown.

Lawdy, just go to their web site and start clicking away, but hold on to your credit card. Following the jump are a couple more images for your Lusting pleasure. Also, feel free to discuss anything vaguely auto-related. 

Continue reading "December 15 Weekly Open Thread: This Is The Time Of Year When Dreams Come True" »

Car Lust Followup: The Renault Le Car

Seeing as it's the 1st of December and we've recently been discussing winterizing our vehicles, I thought I would throw this out for your consideration. I'm not sure this qualifies as a Car Lust exactly, but it definitely qualifies as a Car Thank You. It also represents something of a turning point in my automotive thought process. Herein, my short, sweet, and cold ode to Le Car.  1024px-Renault5-Le_Car

Yes, we have already covered Le Car (or the Le Car, which may be linguistically incorrect however accurate in marketing terms) in its guise as the Renault 5:

Mention the Renault Le Car to the average person on the street, and, if they even remember it, you'll get only snorts of derision and, perhaps, even some open, scornful chortling.

In truth, the Le Car was an awful car with a cutesy name--slow, unreliable, and little more than a French Chevette. To the cynical, it was the latest installment in a decades-long plot to grind Renault's already iffy reputation in America into dust.

I'm afraid I can't add much to that description and won't attempt to. Nevertheless, despite its sordid reputation, Le little Car holds some pride of place in my Car Lust heart if for no other reason than it once saved my life.

Continue reading "Car Lust Followup: The Renault Le Car" »

To Show or Not To Show: That Is The Question

I just wanted to toss this out for Car Lust reader contemplation. The past couple of months I've been wrestling with the question of what to do with my Mustang II. Essentially, to keep it as a fun old car to drive around in, or make it into a show car. I'll run through the pros and cons below, but here's a bit of Car-Show-Fieldbackground to ponder:

First, it's not stock. As the link above indicates, it was my only car for nigh onto 25 years so it got its share of dings and such, and I eventually replaced the engine and exhaust because the old one was pretty wheezy, dirty, and expensive to gas up and maintain. Plus, you know, the old 302 couldn't spin a donut on dry pavement if I tried. Second, despite much of it being in truly excellent condition, it's really not up to car show standards. Oh, I've put it in three Mustang shows and it won something at all three, but in reality it looks pretty pathetic compared to the gleaming, shiny, nearly-perfect cars that populate car shows. So I would be extremely hesitant to put it into a show again without major improvements. Therein lies the rub.

Continue reading "To Show or Not To Show: That Is The Question" »

November 10 Open Thread: The More Things Change. . . . .

You know the saying "There's nothing new under the sun"? Yeah. 

Submitted for your contemplation: Girls + Cars. Cars + Girls. I'm fairly certain that the average Roman  curri dealer occasionally had a couple of calida mulierculae Romana* posing next to the new (AD) 14 models. And you can bet that the first thing some guy will do when he invents an anti-gravity landspeeder is dress up a future honey or two in quasi-futuristic bikinis (or perhaps grab a couple of Fembots) and sit them on the hood. It's what we do. Hence, compare and contrast:

Flappercar

That, according to Vintage Everyday, is a Peerless Touring Car, taken in 1923 in San Francisco.

And here. . . .

Two_girls_one_car_by_Graffton

is a more recent rendition.

A couple of things I noted:

-- There's no bumper on the Infiniti to stand on

-- There's probably more steel in the hood of the Peerless than in the entire Infiniti

-- You could probably outfit 20 of the modern ladies in the material in one of the vintage ladies' suits. 

Anything else? 

Sources for the photos in the links above. And let me tell you, if was a tough assignment doing research for this post. . . . .

* Hot Roman Babes. Loosely translated, of course. 

Great Cars of Death V: Conspiracy Edition

Once again the wind whistles through the trees and a mournful cry drifts across the shadowy moors as ghostly images cruise down silent streets. Is that a Gremlin? A Shadow? Or perhaps a Demon

No, it's just another edition of Great Cars of Death here at Car Lust. This year we've chosen a topical car PattonCarfor highlighting, the 1938 Cadillac Model 75 that General George S. Patton was. . . .almost killed in. Technically, he didn't actually die in the car but did pass away 12 days after having an accident in it that paralyzed him from the neck down. I say 'topical' because Patton is back in the news lately with the release of Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard's latest book in their "Killing. . ." series, Killing Patton:

General George S. Patton, Jr. died under mysterious circumstances in the months following the end of World War II. For almost seventy years, there has been suspicion that his death was not an accident--and may very well have been an act of assassination. Killing Patton takes readers inside the final year of the war and recounts the events surrounding Patton’s tragic demise, naming names of the many powerful individuals who wanted him silenced.

Ooooo. . not only a death but a conspiracy theory, too! Almost as good as a regular old (car-related) ghost story. O'Reilly and Dugard aren't the first to broach the conspiracy angle, it's been kicking around for decades now, but they may be the first to really popularize it. So was there anything to it? Does the car still possess secrets waiting to be uncovered? Read on, but I must warn you: if you believe any of it, we'll have to kill you. . . .

Continue reading "Great Cars of Death V: Conspiracy Edition" »

October 27 Weekly Open Thread: Will No One Rid Me Of These Turbulent Noises?

FIle this one under First World Problems: Since I bought a new vehicle to replace one of 1970s vintage (and an addition to one of 1990s vintage), I have experienced many neat and wondrous things. Such as heaters that heat quickly; quiet; a smooth ride, etc. However, there are one or two things that have been really bugging me. In this case, constant beeping and flashing:

 

Yes, all the infernal beeping and flashing that seems to accompany virtually every press of a button, though to be honest it's mainly locking and unlocking it with the fob. Lock it and it beeps a couple times and the lights flash. Unlock it and it beeps a couple of times and the lights flash. Lock it before the doors are all closed and it beeps and flashes and then beeps again once the doors are all closed. Can this thing not do a simple task without being a drama queen about it? 

I did try to bypass all the beeping and flashing early one morning by simply opening the driver's side door with the key, but then it immediately started beeping and flashing and added blowing the horn to the mix. "No!" it seemed to say, "Bad owner! No driving!"

I imagine there's some way make it all shut the hell up, but it's not risen to that level.

Yet. 

Stealthy entry is not its strong point. 

Sometimes it's really pleasant to get into my old Mustang with a simple turn of the key and nary a beep or a flash to be heard or seen. 

Please discuss this or any other auto-related topic.

October 20 Weekly Open Thread: American Retro Edition

This week we bring your attention to a photo essay by Vanessa, also known as Nessy, the proprietress of Messy Nessy Chic. Recently, Nessy highlighted a few photos by photographer Ryan Schude, many of whose works feature automobiles, both newer and older. Sayeth Nessy: Tree

The fascinating scenes, the colours, the cars, the people, the places– there’s just so much to soak in, but I’m going to let the pictures do all the talking. All I can say is that his pictures have stolen my American retro-loving heart…

Some of them are a bit busy and, well, goofy for my taste (if that's worth anything) but in most cases the photographs featuring automobiles are mostly simple but elegant in composition. You'll notice often the color pallette of the background scenery and the featured automobile are nicely complementary to one another. They look like they really do fit where they are. Most of them have sort of a mid-century modern flair to them (which I adore), even when there's nothing particularly "mid-century" involved (e.g., the '85 Volvo). I'm particularly tickled that one features one of my faves, the Subaru BRAT.

I'll let you all click over and check out the images in her essay and the photographer's Tumblr pages, all of which are both gorgeously shot and feature several cars known throughout these Car Lust parts. And feel free to discuss anything else. Enjoy.

My favorites (so far) include the photo above and this one in particular:

Jag

 UPDATE: Schude's web site is here and he has a Facebook page for more photos.

Open Thread Mystery: The Answer

On Monday I posted a photo of a couple of old pickup trucks as something of a little mystery for Car Lust readers to solve:

MysteryTrucks

So here's the answer to the mystery:

Continue reading "Open Thread Mystery: The Answer" »

2002 -- 2006 Honda CRV

Remember when you were a teenager and you developed various crushes on certain celebrities? Teen girls had their Davy Jones'sDavid Cassidys, Leif Garretts, Rob Lowes, and James Van Der Beeks (pick yer decade, ladies), while we young men had our Farrah Fawcetts, Catherine Bachs, Dallas Cowboys 2006CRVCheerleaders, Britney Spears'ss's, Kate Uptons, and Lamborghini Countachs (hey, we're a little geeky, okay?). Most of those are pretty standard and easily understood even from the pedestal of advanced age. Heck, much to my parents' chagrin, I had Farrah's 1976 Red Swimsuit poster on my wall (along with God knows what all else, I don't even remember; but I remember that one. . .). 

On the other hand many of us probably had one of those that came out of left field that no one else went gonzo over. You know the type, kind of homely, maybe a bit nerdy, and not someone who would leap to mind as being traditionally sexy, hot, or any other adjective that leaps to mind. But for a time they were the center of our little-understood teenaged hormonal universe and we look back on them, again from the pedestal of advanced age, and. . .well, usually get a little wistful after the initial "What was I thinking?" moment. For what it's worth, my bizarro crush was none other than [censored to protect my dignity] so make of that what you will.

Thus my odd and fairly recent fascination with the 2002-2006 Honda CRV. Oh, don't get me wrong, it's a fine vehicle, but more in the way a KitchenAid Mixer is a fine appliance, but definitely not something to almost obsess over. Think perhaps Kate Jackson to Farrah Fawcett. Danny Bonaduce to David Cassidy. Ringo. Answering Mrs. Thurston Howell III to that eternal question for pete's sake! 

So, no, I'm not sure why I've latched onto the CRV as my Objet d'Lust lately. But I suppose admitting it to others is the first step in recovery. . . .

Continue reading "2002 -- 2006 Honda CRV" »

October 13 Weekly Open Thread: Mystery Edition

We get the Halloween season going with a little mystery for Car Lust readers:

MysteryTrucks

Any guesses as to the what, where, significance, etc?

The only hint I'l' give is that I took the photo myself about a week ago.

 

I'll let this sit out there and give a fuller explanation later in the week. 

Feel free to discuss anything else of automotive interest as well.

Pictured above: This is a forlorn Chevy Vega photographed by reader Gary Sinar. (Share yours)

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